Warning: include(includes/functions.php): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/torreste/public_html/www.cabrinimed.com/radioimmunoassay.php on line 7

Warning: include(includes/functions.php): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/torreste/public_html/www.cabrinimed.com/radioimmunoassay.php on line 7

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'includes/functions.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/opt/cpanel/ea-php56/root/usr/share/pear') in /home/torreste/public_html/www.cabrinimed.com/radioimmunoassay.php on line 7

Anatomic Pathology

Radioimmunoassay (RIA)

Radioimmunoassay, otherwise known as RIA, is the technique in which our physicians use radioactive isotopes to quantify specific biochemical substances from your blood samples.

2.1 Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

What is Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)?

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Test is done to find out if your thyroid gland is working the way it should, by measuring hormones in the blood. It is used for early detection of thyroid disease to avoid further health problems.

What are the preparations?

There are no special preparations, however, you are encouraged to fast (not eat or drink) for certain hours before taking the test. You are also requested to tell your physician if you’re taking medications that might interfere with the accuracy of the TSH measurement. Other specific instructions will be given to you during the test.

When should you take it?

You should take Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test when you have signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism and/or enlarged thyroid (goiter).

What are the possible side effects after the treatment?

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a safe procedure, however you may experience the following side effects:

  • Slight bruise at the spot where the needle was put in
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded


For appointments, please email us at nucmed.sfcmc@gmail.com or contact us at (043) 778 4811 loc 8824. You may also visit us on the Ground Floor of the Main Hospital Building from Mondays to Fridays, 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.



2.2 Triiodothyronine (FT3)

What is Triiodothyronine (FT3)?

Triiodothyronine or FT3 is a test used to assess the function of the thyroid, diagnose a thyroid disease, or determine the cause of/monitor the treatment for thyroid cancer.

What are the preparations?

There are no special preparations, however, you are encouraged to fast (not eat or drink) for certain hours before taking the test. You are also requested to tell your physician if you’re taking medications that might interfere with the accuracy of the test. Other specific instructions will be given to you during the test.

When should you take it?

You should take Triiodothyronine or FT3 test when you have signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism and/or enlarged thyroid (goiter) or when you have a thyroid nodule.

What are the possible side effects after the treatment?

Triiodothyronine (FT3) is a safe procedure, however you may experience the following side effects:

  • Slight bruise at the spot where the needle was put in
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded


For appointments, please email us at nucmed.sfcmc@gmail.com or contact us at (043) 778 4811 loc 8824. You may also visit us on the Ground Floor of the Main Hospital Building from Mondays to Fridays, 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.



2.3 Thyroxine (FT4)

What is Thyroxine (FT4)?

Thyroxine (FT4) measures the blood level of your hormone T4, which is responsible for your body’s metabolism and growth. Like the aforementioned tests, it is also used to evaluate thyroid function.

What are the preparations?

There are no special preparations, however, you are encouraged to fast (not eat or drink) for certain hours before taking the test. You are also requested to tell your physician if you’re taking medications that might interfere with the accuracy of the test. Other specific instructions will be given to you during the test.

When should you take it?

You should take Thyroxine or FT4 test when you have signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism and/or enlarged thyroid (goiter) or when you have a thyroid nodule.

What are the possible side effects after the treatment?

An FT4 test has no specific side effects. Risks include those present whenever you have your blood drawn like inflamed vein and small bruise around the puncture site.



For appointments, please email us at nucmed.sfcmc@gmail.com or contact us at (043) 778 4811 loc 8824. You may also visit us on the Ground Floor of the Main Hospital Building from Mondays to Fridays, 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM.